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Tough Trees

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Underutilized Trees You Should Consider Planting

Life in the landscape is tough for a tree.

A tree is faced with competition from other plants, sometimes plants foreign to its indigenous environment. It is forced to coexist with buildings that may project reflective rays and wide temperature fluctuations. Worst of all, the vital soil in which it lives has often been disturbed and deprived of helpful organisms. In many cases, the soil is heavily compacted.

Successful landscaping involves not only taking steps to improve the environment, but also utilizing plants with tough constitutions, plants that have proven their worth in difficult growing conditions. Most of these plants have been tested in their native environments and have grown where most other plants would have simply curled up their root tips and died. Foresters refer to these plants as 'poor site indicators.' Most of these plants have limited commercial value but are excellent choices for the less-than-ideal situations found in disrupted environments.

So here are some choices that will stand a much better chance of not only surviving but also thriving in those almost impossible growing environments...

Woodlawn trees are available in various root size containers, 10 gal. – 280 gal. Not all trees are available in each size. Please contact us for specific information on a tree of interest.

Scientific Name: Alnus cordata
The Italian Alder's beautiful foliage glistens lush and green, even during drought conditions. The bark and branching structure provide winter interest. Durable and trouble-free, the Italian...
Scientific Name: Taxodium distichum
Although native to the southeast, this tree is hardy enough for northern Maine! The Baldcypress grows in swamps and can thrive in year-round flooded areas, but it also survives in dry and co...
Scientific Name: Betula lenta
The Sweet Birch thrives high in the mountains, often in dry, difficult conditions. Common in the wild, it is rarely offered in nurseries. People often focus on Birch trees with showy bark at...
Scientific Name: Betula nigra 'Dura-heat'
A reliable, vigorous performer. This tree is native to stream banks in the eastern deciduous forest. In the wild, it usually grows with multiple stems; however, single-stem specimens are le...
Scientific Name: Cornus officionalis
It's March and you wake up to one of those first, invigorating spring days. Something should be blooming, you think, but around you most plants are still dormant. Enter the Japanese Cornel,...
Scientific Name: Cornus kousa ‘Milky Way Select’
Exquisite trunk and bark. Lovely flowers. Burgundy, red, and orange fall colors - sometimes all three on the same plant! The Kousa is much more amenable to culture than our native flowering...
Scientific Name: Cornus officionalis 'Lemon Zest'
Welcome to Lemon Zest, an improved cultivar of Japanese Cornel! This selection was done by the Morris Arboretum in Philadelphia, and we are pleased to include it in our inventory.
The...
Scientific Name: Abies concolor
Although native to the western US, White Fir has also performed well in the East. Needle color varies from plant to plant, ranging from light blue to a medium green. It will reach 70' high a...
Scientific Name: Abies x bornmuelleriana
Turkish Fir is a natural hybrid of Nordmann Fir and Greek Fir and has a noble form and outline as so many Firs do. The upper side of the fragrant needles is a medium green, but the needles c...
Scientific Name: Tsuga chinensis
Hemlocks are lovely trees, but the use of native species has been hindered by three debilitating pests: Hemlock Wooly Adelgid, Spruce Spider Mites, and Elongate Hemlock Scale. Chinese Hemloc...

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