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Tough Trees

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Underutilized Trees You Should Consider Planting

Life in the landscape is tough for a tree.

A tree is faced with competition from other plants, sometimes plants foreign to its indigenous environment. It is forced to coexist with buildings that may project reflective rays and wide temperature fluctuations. Worst of all, the vital soil in which it lives has often been disturbed and deprived of helpful organisms. In many cases, the soil is heavily compacted.

Successful landscaping involves not only taking steps to improve the environment, but also utilizing plants with tough constitutions, plants that have proven their worth in difficult growing conditions. Most of these plants have been tested in their native environments and have grown where most other plants would have simply curled up their root tips and died. Foresters refer to these plants as 'poor site indicators.' Most of these plants have limited commercial value but are excellent choices for the less-than-ideal situations found in disrupted environments.

So here are some choices that will stand a much better chance of not only surviving but also thriving in those almost impossible growing environments...

Woodlawn trees are available in various root size containers, 10 gal. – 280 gal. Not all trees are available in each size. Please contact us for specific information on a tree of interest.

Elm (Lacebark)
Scientific Name
Ulmus parviflora ‘Allee’
The refined, regal Lacebark Elm is often referred to as the "Allee" Elm because of the commonly used cultivar "Emer II Allee." The bark exfoliates in a puzzle-like pattern, exposing the oran...
Elm (Triumph)
Scientific Name
Ulmus x 'Morton Glossy'
Most fast-growing trees are fraught with problems, but the Triumph Elm is a notable exception. Place this tree in a difficult location where a lesser tree would curl up its root tips and die...
Fir (White)
Scientific Name
Abies concolor
Although native to the western US, White Fir has also performed well in the East. Needle color varies from plant to plant, ranging from light blue to a medium green. It will reach 70' high a...
Hemlock (Chinese)
Scientific Name
Tsuga chinensis
Hemlocks are lovely trees, but the use of native species has been hindered by three debilitating pests: Hemlock Wooly Adelgid, Spruce Spider Mites, and Elongate Hemlock Scale. Chinese Hemloc...
Hophornbeam, American
Scientific Name
Ostrya virginiana
American Hophornbeam is a small to medium-sized native shade tree with flaking bark that blends perfectly with the medium-green foliage. Fall color is yellow. Bark and structure make a nice...
Hophornbeam, American
Scientific Name
Ostrya virginiana
American Hophornbeam is a small to medium-sized native shade tree with flaking bark that blends perfectly with the medium-green foliage. Fall color is yellow. Bark and structure make a nice...
Hornbeam (American)
Scientific Name
Carpinus caroliniana
Rich summer foliage with a dash of reddish new growth. Fall colors of yellow, orange, red, and burgundy. Finely textured structure with fluted trunk to add winter interest.The American Hornb...
Lilac (Peking 'Beijing Gold')
Scientific Name
Syringa pekinensis 'Beijing Gold'
A Tree Lilac with good form and excellent late-spring flowers. Although the bark is not as showy as the "China Snow," the outline is superior with a straighter stem and more balanced growth...
Lilac (Peking 'China Snow')
Scientific Name
Syringa pekinensis 'China Snow'
Pleasing flowers and sensational bark are on offer here, especially in winter when eye candy in the garden is most welcome. The reddish bark exfoliates in horizontal curls reminiscent of the...
Maacki (Amur)
Scientific Name
Maacki amurense
This is a handsome tree, though little known and used. The foliage emerges a unique, blue-green color and matures to a rich, dark green. The spike-like clusters of white flowers bloom midsum...

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